Category Archives: Painting

Jimi Hendrix

JimiHendrixPainting.jpg
Jimi Hendrix
11”x14”
Acrylic on Canvas

I’ve been very motivated lately and just completed my fourth painting in two weeks. My stay-wet palette has allowed me to reuse the same paint for all four paintings although, after two weeks, some of the paint was feeling a little tacky. I’ll start with fresh mixes on the next one.

I approached this painting with a similar process as my Tom Waits and Thelonious Monk portraits — alternating between realistic skin tones and more colorful hues. Like the other portraits, I found that a simple solid background makes the face pop. I added some paint splatters using Yellow Ochre and Burnt Sienna. I got a little carried away especially with the dark Burnt Sienna on some of the lighter parts of the face. I ended up tapping out some of the excess splatters on the nose, cheek and chin. This one took about 11 hours.

Thelonious Monk

TheloniousMonkPainting
Thelonious Monk
11”x14”
Acrylic on Canvas

This one didn’t go as smoothly as my Tom Waits portrait, but I’m still very happy with the result.  The colorful skin tones I started out with didn’t seem to fit the subject, so I pulled them back.  I tried lots of different techniques on the skin including palette knife and glazing which added to the complexity of the skin (see detail).  This one took about 13 hours to complete.

Detail:
TheloniousMonkPaintingDetail

Tom Waits

TomWaitsPainting
Tom Waits
11”x14”
Acrylic on Canvas

I painted this portrait of Tom Waits from a black and white reference photo using just the value information.  The skin tones were left over from my John Taylor portrait, and I created some new mixes for the more colorful skin tones.  The face colors were desaturated by mixing 1 part color and slightly less than 1 part neutral grey.  I used a large and medium flat brush for most of the painting.  This one took about 8 hours.

A short video showing the different stages of the portrait:

John Taylor

JohnTaylorPainting
John Taylor
11”x14″
Acrylic on Canvas

My goal for this practice portrait was to loosen up and not sweat the details. I painted most of it with a large flat brush and resisted the urge to smooth out all of the transitions. I think the painting has a more relaxed look as a result. This one took about 8 hours to complete.

Anthony Green

AnthonyGreenPainting
Anthony Green
11”x14”
Acrylic on Canvas

I’ve been working hard on my process lately. Identifying the shortcomings in my previous paintings and brainstorming solutions. This portrait is the culmination of everything I’ve learned so far. Question going forward: Is it worth the excruciating effort required to achieve realism or would it be better (and more enjoyable) to loosen up and let the brush strokes show? I’m leaning towards the latter…

A short video showing the different stages of the portrait:

Self Portrait #3

DanSelfPortrait3
Self Portrait #3
11”x14”
Acrylic on Canvas

This portrait was an experiment in loosening up and letting the brush strokes show.  It didn’t look very promising at first, but I persisted.  In hindsight, the colors I mixed were too brown/green tinted and the result looks a bit muddled.  I should have started with “normal” skin tones and adjusted their hues more subtly from there.  Also, the overall values of the skin tones are too dark.  I learned a lot of good lessons from this one and plan to apply them to the next painting.

Jeremy Bolm

JeremyBolmPainting
Jeremy Bolm
12”x16″
Acrylic on Canvas

(Painted from a photo by Kyle Kenehan – http://kylekenehanphoto.tumblr.com/)